First case of MIS-C, illness in kids connected to COVID-19, reported in Douglas County

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First case of MIS-C, illness in kids connected to COVID-19, reported in Douglas County

PEOPLE HAVE RECOVERED. (áááLIVEááá) (áááSTEVEááá) WE ARE LEARNING MORE TONIGHT – ABOUT THE 2 CONFIRMED CASES OF P-M-I-S IN IOWA. THE RARE BUT SERIOUS NEW ILLNESS IN CHILDREN – LINKED TO COVID-19. KCCI’S LAURA TERRELL IS LIVE TONIGHT – WITH NEW INFORMATION FROM DOCTORS. (áááLIVEááá) (áááLAURAááá) THE 2 CONFIRMED CASES ARE IN EASTERN IOWA. STATE OFFICIALS SAY BOTH CHILDREN ARE STABLE. (áááPKGááá) (NATS OUTSIDE ST. LUKE’S HOSPITAL) THE TWO CHILDREN DIAGNOSED WITH PMIS ARE RECIEVING CARE HERE AT ST. LUKE’S HOSPITAL IN CEDAR RAPIDS. GOVERNOR REYNOLDS CONFIRMED THE SECOND CASE AT MONDAY’S NEWS CONFERENCE …SAYING HER TEAM IS KEEPING A CLOSE EYE ON THE NEW ILLNESS KNOWN AS MULTI-SYSTEM INFLAMMATORY SYNDROME. IT APPEARS TO BE A RARE DELAYED REACTION TO COVID- 19 IN CHILDREN…CAUSING INFLAMMATION IN THE BLOOD VESSELS. DOCTORS ARE LEARNING ABOUT PMIS EVERY DAY – AND NOW SAY GI ISSUES COME BEFORE THE PERSITENT FEVER, BRIGHT RED EYES AND WHOLE BODY RASH AND SWELLING. DR. JOEL WADDELL IS A PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE SPECIALIST AT UNITY POINT. HIS ADVICE TO PARENTS IS KEEP UP WITH THEIR CHILD’S WELL CHECKS AND VACCINES. A SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF CHILDREN MISSED THEIR SHOTS IN FEBRUARY AND MARCH, HE SAYS. STATE OFFICIALS MADE PMIS A MANDATORY REPORTABLE CONDITION. THAT MEANS THEY CAN STUDY THE DATA AND GIVE ADVICE TO DAYCARES AND SCHOOLS. FOR NOW, DR. WADDELL DOESN’T WANT PARENTS TO PANIC..WHILE IT CAN BE SERIOUS, PMIS IS TREATABLE. (áááLIVEááá) (áááLAURAááá) DR. WADELL SAYS THE BEST WAY TO PREVENT YOUR CHILD GETTING INFECTED IS BY FOLLOWING CDC GUIDELINES. HE SAYS THAT MEANS LOTS OF HAND WASHING, AVOIDI

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First case of MIS-C, illness in kids connected to COVID-19, reported in Douglas County

The first case of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS-C), a condition believed to be related to COVID-19, has been reported in Douglas County, health officials said Monday. Officials said a boy under the age of 12 was hospitalized with a rash, fever, fatigue and abdominal pain. He had been exposed to someone who was COVID-19 positive.“If your child shows any of these symptoms, you should immediately seek emergency care,” Health Director Dr. Adi Pour said. “We have a lot to learn about MIS, but it appears to be similar to Kawasaki disease which includes a fever and some of the symptoms we are seeing here.”MIS-C can lead to multiple organ inflammation and can be deadly. Many children who have MIS-C have been around someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 and may themselves have tested positive for the disease. “Please don’t delay in seeking help for your child if they show any MIS-C symptoms,” Dr. Pour said. “This condition is potentially extremely serious.”

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OMAHA, Neb. —

The first case of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS-C), a condition believed to be related to COVID-19, has been reported in Douglas County, health officials said Monday.

Officials said a boy under the age of 12 was hospitalized with a rash, fever, fatigue and abdominal pain. He had been exposed to someone who was COVID-19 positive.

“If your child shows any of these symptoms, you should immediately seek emergency care,” Health Director Dr. Adi Pour said. “We have a lot to learn about MIS, but it appears to be similar to Kawasaki disease which includes a fever and some of the symptoms we are seeing here.”

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MIS-C can lead to multiple organ inflammation and can be deadly. Many children who have MIS-C have been around someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 and may themselves have tested positive for the disease.

“Please don’t delay in seeking help for your child if they show any MIS-C symptoms,” Dr. Pour said. “This condition is potentially extremely serious.”